After 20 Years, The Queen of Cookies Has a New Favorite Recipe (2024)

"I will never stop." That's what Dorie Greenspan tells me when I ask her if she's got any new chocolate chip cookie recipes in the works. (And she's not kidding: Right now, she's playing—and yes, that's the word—with a cookie where the whole wheat flour is replaced with oatmeal.)

Dorie can't give the chocolate chip cookies a rest. After twenty years of devotion to her "My Classic Best Chocolate Chip Cookies," which she published in 2006's Baking: From My Home to Yours with the bold claim that, "in the category of 'Great Chocolate Chip Cookies,' these get my vote for the greatest," she's out with another: "My Newest Chocolate Chip Cookies." They're one of 170 recipes in her twelfth book Dorie's Cookies, which publishes October 25.

On paper, the differences between Dorie's late great cookie and the young starlet appear few (so few, in fact, that the new recipe includes a short note on the sidebar for how to revert back to the classics): Dorie's latest chocolate chippers (an expression of hers that I vow to adopt) include a mix of all-purpose and whole wheat flour; a bit more brown sugar (3/4 cup as opposed to 2/3); and, here's the real trick-up-her-sleeve, 1/4 teaspoon of finely grated nutmeg and 1/4 teaspoon ground coriander. (Also: They have a bit less chocolate and no nuts—not game-changing.)

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What sort of impact can such small changes have? The tweaks add up to enough of a departure, in both flavor and texture, that the cookie earns itself more than just an addendum tacked onto the original recipe, but rather a whole new name—a page of its own.

Due to the inclusion of whole wheat flour and the slight increase in brown sugar, these newbies are darker and flatter, with a texture that's chewier and the slightest bit cakey: They bend in half slowly; the Classic Best do a delayed snap. "I wanted a cookie that looked more classic than my classic but had a surprise element that my classic didn’t," Dorie said.

And that element of surprise is the "mini blend" of nutmeg, cardamom, and salt that pulls everything together. It's a tiny amount (1/4 teaspoon of each spice and 1 1/4 teaspoons fine sea salt) that works in the background to build flavor: "A little bit more," Dorie explained, "and I think it would’ve been too much." It was a combination that took many trials to land on, then optimize:

I had this idea that I wanted it to be cardamom. I was playing with cardamom and at some point, I had allspice. I wasn’t going to use nutmeg at all. I was just going to use cardamom or coriander—they kind of have an almost citrusy flavor to them. And I didn’t want to use cinnamon because it’s the go-to with chocolate chip.

But it needed, whether with the cardamom or the coriander, something that pulled it back into Chocolate-Chip-Ville, and that was the nutmeg, which—I don’t have a vocabulary for this sort of thing—it's not as earthy or hot as cinnamon, it's kind of citrusy. I was excited to introduce nutmeg and coriander to one another.

No one who tasted the cookies under my watch could put a finger on the ground coriander (and only one person could identify the nutmeg). But it pleased Dorie to hear that her prized spice combination made the cookies different in an unidentifiable way: "If I could add one ingredient to everything I cook or bake, it would be surprise. And in a way, that’s what the nutmeg and coriander do. They don’t knock you over the head, but they make you say, 'Hmmm, there’s something different about this cookie.

For a baker who has created over 300 cookie recipes in her twelve-book career, a countless number of which can be classified as "chocolate chip," Dorie's goal with this book was to "stretch myself and to stretch what a cookie was or a cookie could be. I wanted to learn something—because if I can’t learn something while I’m working, then I don’t feel like the work is very good."

I was worried that working on one subject, I would run out of ideas. And in fact, I found that focusing on one thing made me a lot more creative: My mind was just filled with cookies.

Dorie Greenspan

She's been learning about chocolate chip cookies alone for decades, since well before her Classic Best were published in 2006. "I think I really probably started to play with chocolate chip cookies right after I met Pierre Hermé" in the early 90s ("or maybe we were brother and sister in another life"). It was the illustrious French baker who told her "something we really take for granted now"—that salt needs to be used in baking as it is in cooking: as a seasoning. "At the time we were talking about this, most recipes had a pinch of salt—you weren't measuring it into a cookie. I started changing my chocolate chip cookies after that conversation."

No cookie—chocolate chip or otherwise—is safe from Dorie's constant tinkering. "It's hard for me to say when something is done." Even after recipes for her book were fully tested, met with rave reviews from her testers, she couldn't leave them alone. "I have sent ideas to my editor after I’ve turned in the book."

"I was worried that working on one subject, I would run out of ideas. And, in fact, I found that focusing on just one thing made me a lot more creative: My mind was just filled with cookies."

Some cookies just say, "Don’t leave me here: You have to play with me! You have to give me a new life!"

Dorie Greenspan

So will there be another chocolate chip cookie? You can bet. "Pastry is the sister art to architecture: You can constantly construct. When you have a really great recipe that you love, it can be the basis of so many things, and some cookies just say, 'Don’t leave me here: You have to play with me! You have to give me a new life!' And I listen to my cookies."

All this cookie talk left you hungry? Conduct your own taste test:

My Classic Best Chocolate Chip Cookies View Recipe

Ingredients

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt (1 1/4 teaspoons if you really like salt)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 sticks (8 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 cup sugar
2/3 cup (packed) light brown sugar
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
2 large eggs
12 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped into chips, or 2 cups store-bought chocolate chips or chunks
1 cup finely chopped walnuts or pecans
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt (1 1/4 teaspoons if you really like salt)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 sticks (8 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 cup sugar
2/3 cup (packed) light brown sugar
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
2 large eggs
12 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped into chips, or 2 cups store-bought chocolate chips or chunks
1 cup finely chopped walnuts or pecans
My Newest Chocolate Chip Cookies View Recipe

Ingredients

1 3/4 cups (238 grams) all-purpose flour
2/3 cup (91 grams) whole wheat flour
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander
2 sticks (8 ounces; 226 grams) unsalted butter, cut into chunks, at room temperature
1 cup (200 grams) sugar
3/4 cup (150 grams) packed light brown sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons fine sea salt
2 large eggs, at room temperature
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
10 ounces (283 grams) semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped (or 1 2/3 cups chocolate chips)
1 3/4 cups (238 grams) all-purpose flour
2/3 cup (91 grams) whole wheat flour
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander
2 sticks (8 ounces; 226 grams) unsalted butter, cut into chunks, at room temperature
1 cup (200 grams) sugar
3/4 cup (150 grams) packed light brown sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons fine sea salt
2 large eggs, at room temperature
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
10 ounces (283 grams) semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped (or 1 2/3 cups chocolate chips)

P.S. When I asked Dorie which chocolate chip recipe she'd make if she had to go into the kitchen to bake a batch right now, she told me she'd turn to a new version. And another tip from the Head Cook(ie) herself: Don't sweep the chocolate dustings that come from chopping bars into the trash can. "I include the dust in my recipes—I love that you take a chocolate chip cookie and make it even more chocolatey than normal. "

Are you in the market for a new chocolate chip cookie recipe, or are you otherwise committed? Tell us in the comments.

After 20 Years, The Queen of Cookies Has a New Favorite Recipe (2024)

FAQs

What was Queen Elizabeth's favorite cookie? ›

These Buckingham Palace Shortbread Cookies are rich, tender, and buttery. They were among the late Queen Elizabeth's favorite sweets for her afternoon tea. This recipe is from the Buckingham Palance Pastry Chef, John Higgins.

What is the #1 cookie in the world? ›

Oreo is the best-selling cookie in the world. It is now sold in over 100 countries. Oreo was first produced in 1912 by the National Biscuit Company, now known as Na-Bis-Co.

What is the most popular cookie flavor in the world? ›

52% of Americans prefer chocolate chip cookies over any other type of cookie. Oreo cookies are the number one selling cookie brand in the world. 19% of Americans say that oatmeal raisin is their favorite cookie flavor.

What sandwich did Queen Elizabeth eat every day? ›

Former Royal Chef Darren McGrady says that Queen Elizabeth ate her favorite snack, jam sandwiches (aka jam pennies), every day for more than 90 years.

What did Queen eat for breakfast? ›

For breakfast she keeps things simple. Royal biographer, Katie Nicholl, has previously said: "HRH typically starts with a simple cup of tea and biscuits, followed by a bowl of cereal." (The Guardian previously reported she likes to keep it in Tupperware to preserve its freshness.)

What cookie did Oreo copy? ›

Oreo was created in 1912 as an imitation of Hydrox. Oreo eventually surpassed Hydrox in popularity, which resulted in the Hydrox cookies being perceived by many as an Oreo off-brand, despite the opposite being the case.

What is the most loved cookie? ›

Chocolate chip cookies

What is the most popular type of cookie? It might just be this one.

What is the #1 cookie in the United States? ›

The chocolate chip cookie is far and away America's favorite cookie This should come as no surprise to anyone who enjoys the tasty treat. More than 53% of American adults prefer the cookies over the next most popular kind, peanut butter.

What is the best selling cookie of all time? ›

Oreo is the world's best-selling cookie and has been a favorite for over 100 years. Its popularity can be attributed to its unique sandwich cookie design and creamy filling. Oreo is a popular sandwich cookie that consists of two chocolate wafers filled with a sweet, creamy filling.

What is the Favourite cookie in USA? ›

America's favorite cookie and the one dubbed “the American cookie” is the Chocolate chip cookie.

What is America's Favourite cookie? ›

First created in 1912, the Oreo™ is a sandwich style biscuit comprising cream filling between two biscuits. They were created by the National Biscuit Company (Nabisco) as an imitation of another similar biscuit called Hydrox.

Does cold cookie dough bake better? ›

Cool down your dough for a tastier, chewier cookie.

As little as 30 minutes in your fridge or freezer can help your cookie brown better, spread less, and develop a richer chewy texture. There's a few reasons why, but one important part is it gives the butter in your dough a chance to firm up before baking.

Why is refrigerated cookie dough better? ›

"When your dough is refrigerated, the butter hardens. So when you bake them, they spread less and hold their shape better," adds Epperson. "Which means a better likelihood of a soft, chewy cookie in the center." Chilling the dough creates fluffier cookies with better consistency.

Is it best to chill cookie dough before baking? ›

Since most cookies are made with softened butter, which is then creamed with the sugar to act as the foundation, it's best to chill the dough after mixing to allow that butter to cool off. “Cookies made from chilled dough expand more slowly as they bake,” Hill says.

What was Queen Elizabeth's favorite dessert? ›

Posted on www.today.com (Read original article here.) “This chocolate biscuit cake is Her Royal Majesty the Queen's favorite afternoon tea cake by far,” chef Darren McGrady, The Royal Chef and former personal chef to Queen Elizabeth II, told TODAY Food.

What sweets did Queen Elizabeth eat? ›

Chocolate Biscuit Cake

The queen had a legendary love of sweets, especially anything chocolate. She especially enjoyed a classic icebox-style cake using simple tea biscuits suspended in an egg-enriched ganache and then chilled before coated in a thin layer of chocolate.

What is Queen Elizabeth II Favourite dessert? ›

Chocolate biscuit cake is reportedly one of the Royal Family's favourite desserts, which "has become irresistible to generations of royal diners". Former royal chef Darren McGrady revealed that “the crunchy chocolate treat was a staple at the Queen's afternoon teas".

What desserts did Queen Elizabeth eat? ›

When it's time to treat herself, McGrady revealed that all the Queen wants is a piece of chocolate biscuit cake. The cake is reportedly made in-house (or, more appropriately, in-palace), and Her Majesty consumes one slice per day.

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